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Housing in Philippines
 
 
 

The Philippines has big cities, isolated hamlets and everything in between. It also has many coastal resorts. The country has more than 7,000 islands, so it shouldn’t be hard to find one that’s right for you. Living costs vary widely, with Manila being at the top of the list. But no matter where you are, the cost of living will be dramatically lower than a comparable area in a western nation.

Your budget and needs will determine the best type of residential unit for you. However, not that Makati has the highest lease/rental price for residential units.

For example, a small (at least 30 sq.m.) one-bedroom flat with kitchen and a living room is rented out starting from P15,000 a month, while a house with two bedrooms, a kitchen, living room and other facilities starts at P30,000.

If you are looking for something more affordable look for places outside Makati City like the Ortigas area in Pasig City, Mandaluyong City, and Ermita areas area ideal locations and can be cheaper than the financial district.

Residential buildings usually have round-the-clock security personnel monitoring the coming and going of visitors, accepting mails and deliveries in your behalf. Subdivisions, especially the large ones, also have security checkpoints manned by personnel to screen visitors. In both cases, be prepared to pay the monthly association fees ranging from P500 to as much as P2,000 unless your landlord agrees to shoulder the cost.

Upon making your choice, insist on a lease contract before making down payment and moving in. A contract determines the terms and conditions of the lease between you and the owner or landlord. It states the amount of deposit required, usually from two months equivalent to one year. Make sure you check every provision of the contract and among the terms to watch out for are: the return of deposit made in case one moves out; who will shoulder the repair of facilities; who will play for the utilities and monthly dues, etc. If you are unsure of the terms, approach your company lawyer who can check the provisions in your favor.